Evil Has A Name – The Untold Story of the Golden State Killer: A True Crime Podcast

The unpretentious, no frills way that Debbie presents us with the series of events, and their ultimate effect on her life, with very few interuptions is a masterclass in letting a story tell itself, and should be considered gold standard for true crime podcasting everywhere.

Death as a Living: A True Crime Book

If you are looking for the next great literary piece of true crime in the tradition of Capote, then this will not be the book for you, and that is exactly as it should be. True Crime while often tending towards the most shocking, spooky or gruesome does reflect life, thankfully an extreme of life many of us won't experience, but life none-the-less. Burke, who comes across as a down to earth man of the people makes this memoire all the stronger by retaining his authentic voice, which is the books ultimate strength, rather than trying for literary kudos.

The Vanishing Triangle: A True Crime Book

McGowan, feels like the right person to have written this book. It is true as a fiction writer she doesn't have the investigative experience of a journalist or former detective, nor the sharp academic skill of a criminologist or sociologist, but what makes her perfect is that she herself grew up in the triangle and was a young woman at the time of the dissaperances and murders.

Two Faced by Happy Face: A True Crime podcast

Moore, with her highly unique experience is slowly building a podcast which is valuble in the true crime field, it deepens our understanding of the innocents effected by brutal crimes, the ones that all our storytelling forms, news, films, books have neglected. For those who truly seek to understand the most devient crimes, understanding not just what led up to them, but also there half life is equally important, and Moore does so well in giving a voice, to those who had previously been voiceless.

Paradise: A True Crime Podcast

The fact that behind the fandom, obsessiveness and excitement that true crime can illicit in it's follower there is terrible pain. Not a pain that is showey and ostentacious, but the pain so many people carry with them every day, which becomes a constant companion and eventually is just part of you. It is a reminder of how things happen to people, and the choices that impact us the most are often the ones other people make, sometimes far, far away. Their ripples are sent out throughout the world, but always hit the heart.

Men Who Hate Women – A True Crime Book

Bates book is part of a genre I have decided to name True Dystopia, so unrelenting and difficult to counter are the subculture she maps. However, at the end of the book we do gain some glimmers of hope as to how these incidious and dangerous ideas can be dealt with, and it will take a lot more energy and time than I suspect many realise. It is not the internet per say that has created these groups, but general culture, the internet just allowed communications between their individual members, who have used that opportunity the way any living organisim does, to grow, to become stronger, to reproduce.

Interview with Daniel Seton, Commissioning Editor at Pushkin Press

Daniel Seton, Commissioning Editor at Pushkin Press, and good conversationalist. This week instead of a review Mairi interviews Daniel Seaton who is the Commissioning Editor at award winning Pushkin Press, who recently published Dust Off The Bones, which was reviewed on TCF earlier this year. You can listen to the full interview here, which ranges …

Continue reading Interview with Daniel Seton, Commissioning Editor at Pushkin Press

Unravelled: A True Crime Podcast

Once you've been consuming true crime for a while things can get, well, a bit boring. It is possible to hear the same cases again, and again, all researched from the same Wikipedia article, and as humans we crave novelty. However as a genre which has to do more than any other in terms of ethical naval gazing the search for novelty is something that has to be finely and carefully balanced with what is both legal and moral. It is this difficult high wire act where Unravelled is placing itself.