Pride month bonus: The best crime podcasts and books with an LGBTIQ+ flavour

For LGBTIQ+ communties crime is too much of a reality. Across the globe queer people are more likely to be victims of crime, historically they have been more likely to be criminalised, and in many places the fear of imprisonment for being nothing more than who you really are is far, far too present. So in this post we are going to pinpoint some of the best podcasts and books TCF has reviewed over the last seventeen months which whether fiction or non-fiction have an LGBTIQ+ element.

The House That Vanished: A True Crime Podcast About the Disappearance of Neville Presho’s house.

In life things are seldom as permanent as we think they will be when we are children. The art of accepting and living with change is one of the secrets of life, and one that all of us will struggle with at some point, whether it is the end of a relationship, a job, or …

Continue reading The House That Vanished: A True Crime Podcast About the Disappearance of Neville Presho’s house.

If You Tell by Gregg Olsen: A True Crime Book

Motherhood is an idea that permeates If You Tell by Greg Olsen by it's absence. Olsen recounts the life of Shelly Knotek, who killed three, and abused countless others, including her own children. Knotek could easily be cast in the role of femme fatal, her good looks attracting many unsuspecting men into her orbit, but that would be too surface a reading of what is a clearly aberant pshycology. Instead Olsen makes his readers the proverbial frog in water slowly begining to boil, as he trace the development of Knotek from a troubled and difficult child and teen into a fully fledged murderer.

Girl, 11: A Crime Fiction book about a true crime podcaster

It is never long before crime fiction follows true crime, and one has to wonder if the podcaster could be poised to replace the private eye, who's peak in crime fiction does feel somewhat in the past.  The prospect of the podcaster as the new crime fiction hero - or more likely heroine, given true crimes demographics - is intriguing, as they bring in not just a new job, but drag with them an audience.

Happy Birthday True Crime Fiction

February 14th 2022, is True Crime Fiction's first birthday, so I feel it is important to thank everyone who has been listening to the podcast, reading the website, sharing and liking posts and in general to those who have enjoyed TCF. It has been hard work, and at times the review schedule has felt a little oppressive, but given that I was not really sure what would come out of True Crime Fiction, I am really pleased with what it has produced. We've had over 11,000 downloads in the first year and we've got plans for future development.

The Sleep of Reason – The James Bulger Case: A True Crime Book

For even the most hardened of true crime fans there are some crimes that we edge around, because they are too disturbing, too difficult and too horrible to look full in the face. There are other crimes that stick in the mind, become a landmark in memory and culture, the names involved becoming bigger than the person they used to be attached to and instead filled with emotion and meaning which is hard to quantify or contain.